3 Best Cycling Routes in Mexico

Mountain biking rider with bike looking at inspiring sea and mountains landscape. Man cycling MTB on enduro rocky trail path at sea side. Summer sport, training fitness motivation and inspiration.At some point, most serious cyclists start dreaming of hitting the trails in Mexico. Much of the highways in Mexico aren’t necessarily ideal for cycling—very narrow shoulders—but most cyclists flock to Mexico for the backcountry views anyway. If you plan to hit the trails with a mountain bike, be sure to bring extra tubes and a well-stocked repair kit.

Punta Venado Mountain Bike Park

Mountain bike enthusiasts can’t leave Mexico without a visit to the Punta Venado Mountain Bike Park, which is located in Riviera Maya. It’s a relatively recent recreational endeavor, with miles of well-maintained trails for novice, intermediate, and advanced cyclists. At the end of 2014, the bike park reported having 16 miles of trails through jungle, and along mangroves, cenotes, and of course, the beach. Try not to bike too fast, as you might miss the wildlife. Bring a durable camera and get some shots of the spider monkeys.

The bike park is just a quick drive away from Cancun. If you’re coming from Cozumel, take the ferry. In addition to riding the well-groomed trails, this eco-adventure destination features plenty to do for those who love snorkeling, horseback riding, kite-surfing, and more.

Peto to Piste in the Yucatan

The Yucatan is a much-beloved destination of serious cyclists. The route from Peto to Piste is 96 kilometers. It’s a fairly easy route with predominantly flat terrain that passes through sleepy towns, some of which operate on the Mayan language, not Spanish. The route from Peto to Piste is a great choice for beginner to intermediate cyclists who are interested in experiencing Mayan culture first-hand.

Merida to Chichen Itza in the Yucatan

The colonial capital of Merida is about a four hour drive from Cancun. Arrange transportation for you and your bike to this drop-off point, but don’t get started cycling right away. Take some time to tour the market—a must-see for every new visitor. Then, head out on paved roads and enjoy views of the jungle as you head toward Izamal. It’s known as the Yellow City. As you might expect, the buildings are all painted a cheerful shade of yellow. Take a rest here and check out the Mayan pyramid of Kinich Kak Moo.

Continue on through the jungle and small villages until you reach Chichen Itza. This revered pyramid is far more heavily visited than Kinich Kak Moo. You could end your trek here, or, if you’re interested in extending your stay, continue on to the Mayan village of Uayma. It’s not far from the Cenote Samula, a sinkhole with a natural underground pool. Celebrate your journey with a swim to cool off.

Whether you’re interested in a cycling day trip or you plan a long-haul trek across Mexico’s beautiful countryside, you can find the accommodations you need with Sea Side Reservations. We are an industry leader in arranging safe, fully vetted accommodations for visitors throughout Mexico. Just let us know your check in and check out dates, and your destination(s), and let our travel experts handle the rest.

Friday, September 1st, 2017
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CEDO sustainability event

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CEDO is the Intercultural Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans. Located on the Sea of Cortez in Las Conchas, scientists and interns work to find ways to preserve the nature around them, while being a source for education as well. Working with

CEDO is the Intercultural Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans. Located on the Sea of Cortez in Las Conchas, scientists and interns work to find ways to preserve the nature around them, while being a source for education as well. Working with local fishermen, CEDO helps to maintain a healthy balance of resource use in this part of the ocean.

An event on Saturday, November 8th will showcase some of those who are working with local resources. Weather through crafts, seafood, or ecotourism, all of the vendors use what they find locally in a sustainable way. This makes sure that what Mexico’s oceans have to offer is here for future genrations.

The CEDO facility is in a rambling old building on a hill of sand that rolls down to the sea. The building hosts camps for children to learn about the worlds oceans, exhibits about the local sealife, as well as serving as a base for projects involving local fisherman. A distinctive part of the CEDO building is the complete Humpback Whale skeleton that sits at the very top of the hill.

CEDO is easy to reach on the main road into Las Conchas. The CEDO Naturarte Market Place Sustaonable Local Prodcts Event will be in the parking lot on Saturday, November 8th, from 10:00am to 4:00pm. The event is designed to “encourage responsoble people doing doing efforts towards sustainability and a space to sell their products.”

fishermen, CEDO helps to maintain a healthy balance of resource use in this part of the ocean.

An event on Saturday, November 8th will showcase some of those who are working with local resources. Weather through crafts, seafood, or ecotourism, all of the vendors use what they find locally in a sustainable way. This makes sure that what Mexico’s oceans have to offer is here for future genrations.

The CEDO facility is in a rambling old building on a hill of sand that rolls down to the sea. The building hosts camps for children to learn about the worlds oceans, exhibits about the local sealife, as well as serving as a base for projects involving local fisherman. A distinctive part of the CEDO building is the complete Humpback Whale skeleton that sits at the very top of the hill.

CEDO is easy to reach on the main road into Las Conchas. The CEDO Naturarte Market Place Sustaonable Local Prodcts Event will be in the parking lot on Saturday, November 8th, from 10:00am to 4:00pm. The event is designed to “encourage responsoble people doing doing efforts towards sustainability and a space to sell their products.”

Thursday, November 6th, 2014
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Stand-Up-Paddleboards and Kayaks: rent them now through Seaside Reservations

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Stand up paddle boarding is cool. It is not hard to get the hang of, and then it kind of feels like your’re out taking a walk. On the water! With some experience, you can play in the surf. But hey, this is a vacation, so take it easy.

Sitting out on the water as the sun sets is one of the greatest experiences you can have while in Rocky Point. Morning and just before sunset are the two best times to catch a glimpse of dolphins as they pass by in a pod. Curious and intelliegent, many times they will come close to check YOU out.

First timers or even experienced boarders can have everything they need delivered to your resort, if you are renting your condo through Seaside Reservations. If you have never done it, it is a painless way to check out a new sport.

Or how about kayaking. Sit-on-top kayaks are available as well. Whatever your preference, Seaside Reservations new rental program gives you, your family, and friends, a couple more ways to make memories on your Rocky

Stand up paddle boarding is cool. It is not hard to get the hang of, and then it kind of feels like your’re out taking a walk. On the water! With some experience, you can play in the surf. But hey, this is a vacation, so take it easy.

Sitting out on the water as the sun sets is one of the greatest experiences you can have while in Rocky Point. Morning and just before sunset are the two best times to catch a glimpse of dolphins as they pass by in a pod. Curious and intelliegent, many times they will come close to check YOU out.

First timers or even experienced boarders can have everything they need delivered to your resort, if you are renting your condo through Seaside Reservations. If you have never done it, it is a painless way to check out a new sport.

Or how about kayaking. Sit-on-top kayaks are available as well. Whatever your preference, Seaside Reservations new rental program gives you, your family, and friends, a couple more ways to make memories on your Rocky Point vacation.

by Richard Scott

Wednesday, September 24th, 2014
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Labor Day Weekend Off Road and Turtles Return

The Midnight Wreck Off Road Race

The long last weekend of Summer is right around the corner. Southern Arizona Desert Racing brings two night off road excitement as the next in their series of events here in Rocky Point.

Things start on Friday August 29th with a poker run. The night races start with bikes, quads, and UTV’s. Two more races will be for trucks and pre-runners, then finally for cars and pro-trucks.

For More information, check out the SADR on Facebook.

The turtles are back!

We recently saw the natural process play out on Rocky Points’ beaches, as a sea tutle laid eggs only to have them fail to mature successfully. Our beaches are on the very edge of the range for the Pacific Olive Ridley to nest, so the failure rate is expected to be higher.

Now, just a couple of weeks later, another nest of eggs has been laid, this time further out of town heading towards the Mayan Palace Resort. A protective barrier has gone up, and we will all wait with crossed fingers. An average of 100 little turtles can hatch in approximately 50 days, give or take.

by Richard Scott

Turtle Protection.

Turtle Protection.

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Monday, August 25th, 2014
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Breaking News: Sandy Beach Sea Turtle Eggs

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As I came home from a muggy afternoon. I sit down and answer a phone call from my niece. I talk with her and look out the window to notice a group of people gathered around the protective fencing directly below. I rush down the elevator. “Great” I think, they must be hatching. “I’m anticipating getting to see them making a run for the water.” As I approach the beach it seems odd to me that I don’t see tracks or little turtles. I only and see children and adults standing inside the fenced area exactly where the eggs should be.
I tap a gentleman on the shoulder. “Sir, what’s going on? Are the turtles already gone?” It turns out its “Larry” who owns several properties I manage.
Larry proceeds to tell me that the turtle that laid her eggs here must have confused her location. Unfortunately it was too hot for the eggs to survive and when the Ocean Biologists checked on the eggs none the embryos had survived.
The little black bag that this child is holding is what is left of what our little city or Puerto Penasco held our breath for waiting for the Turtles to return to the sea.
Steve Schwab

Wednesday, August 13th, 2014
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Turtle nesting on Sandy Beach

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Just in time for the Fourth of July, it appears that an Pacific Olive Ridley Sea Turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) has come ashore on Sandy Beach to deposit her eggs! We see one or two of these events every few years, so it is pretty special. Olive Ridleys are found in the oceans throughout the world. The western coast of Mexico is one of the prime nesting areas, but it is more common to see them a lot further south, especially around Puerto Vallarta.

‘Arribadas’ are when masses of these turtles come together to give birth on one beach. Here in Rocky Point, this lone nesting site will be protected by the authorities to enhance the chances that the eggs will reach maturity (something that takes around fifty days, and produces up to one hundred eggs).

Visitors to town were walking Sandy Beach near Puerta Privada when they came across the turtle, wading out of the water. They made a call to the local police, who contacted Profepa, more or less Mexicos’ EPA. Minutes later, eggs tucked into the sand, the turtle hit the waves and was gone.

The nesting of this endangered species is a reminder of just how connected to the natural world Puerto Penasco is.

Friday, July 4th, 2014
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Rocio del Mar dive ship

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Eco-Tourism in Rocky Point is a growing business. There are boat trips to Bird Island; a place where you can experience a colony of Sea lions up close. People choose to kayak or dive in, you can actually swim with the young and curious animals.

The nearby Pinacate Biosphere Reserve is popular with those who love a true wilderness experience. Over six hundred square miles of black lava flows, cinder cones, and seas of rippling sand dunes spread to the horizon, inviting the adventurous to see Mexico at its’ wildest.

Puerto Peñasco is also the point of departure for voyages to the remote Islands that dot the Northern Sea of Cortez. Much of the treasure of Mexicos’ natural world lives in its’ oceans. The 110 foot Rocio del Mar takes divers to explore places that can be seen no other way. This fourth of July weekend, the Rocio heads out for a week long live-aboard dive trip to the Midriff Islands.

Once called ‘The worlds’ aquarium” by dive pioneer Jacques Cousteau, the Sea of Cortez still maintains an attraction for those who want to encounter the large pelagic species that frequent these waters. Schools of hammerhead sharks, humpback whales, manta rays and more are a regular part of a dive trip. A live-aboard allows for multiple days in remote locations, as well as the ability to dive in more than one spot.

Dora and Francisco Sandoval, experienced dive masters, own the Rocio del Mar. Beginning its’ sea going life in 2009, the Sandovals built her from scratch, with the intention to provide a ship designed around the experience of diving, unique in a sport where most are modified fishing boats. The Rocio accomodates twenty divers, and is in service with multiple trips per year to not only the Sea of Cortez, but out to the Revellagigedo Islands, known as Mexicos’ Gallapagos. Having just completed her yearly maintenance in the docks of Rocky Point, she readies for her next adventure.

These voyages are for experienced divers, coming from over the globe. Normally sold out months in advance, the next voyage departs this Fourth of July from the Fonatur docks. Over a dozen dive sites are possibIlities as the Rocio del Mar plys thewaters around Angel Island and others.

*Rocio del Mar departs out of Rocky Point and Cabo San Lucas during the spring and fall

*Trips exlore the Sea of Cortez and Soccoro Islands

*Twenty divers maximum, with a very experienced staff and state of the art supporting equipment.

*Visit rociodelmarliveaboard.com or contact 602-558-9580

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014
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Who’s going on a Sunset Cruise?

Pirate Cruiser on her way back to the port.

Pirate Cruiser on her way back to the port.

One popular way to start a visit to Rocky Point is to board one of the Sunset Cruises that set sail in the evening. Some boats are small with an intimate feel, others are a big floating party. All offer a chance to unwind, have a drink and a snack, and enjoy the beauty of a Rocky Point sunset with friends and family. These cruises are popular with dolphins too! It’s very common for them to swim along in front of the boat, like tour guides taking you to their favorite spot.

You can find the boats in the harbor as you drive into the Malecon area. The front desk where you are staying can usually help you reserve a spot.

 

Friday, June 27th, 2014
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Eagle Rescue

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Photo by Richard Scott

More and more, people see Rocky Point as a place for eco-tourism. Whale watching, hiking the Piñacate Biosphere Reserve, kayaking the estuaries – all are ways to get in touch with the natural beauty found here. Lots of wildlife can be seen too. Studying and protecting this unique place where desert meets the sea is the job of CEDO.

The Center for the Study of Deserts and Oceans (CEDO) is in Las Conchas on a sandy hill above the beach. One day finds CEDO researchers in a remote camp working with fisherman, the next night, wading in a tide pool, leading a group of school kids as they discover life hiding under every rock. Recently they were called on to do something a little different.

“We have one nest in front of CEDO. Another one is about 500 meters to the northeast, near the coast too.” Hiram Peña Bonilla, CEDO Assistant Director, got a call from someone walking their dog. “The Osprey was caught in a fishing net, and couldn’t fly.” Ospreys are eagles that dive dramatically into the sea to catch breakfast. They can be seen flying overhead hauling huge fish in their talons, a look of open mouthed surprise on the fish.
All over town their nests are found someplace high, often a telephone poll. Ropes, sticks, and other sea debris are used by eagles to make their nests. This time, using fish net had turned the nest into a trap.

“The fire department helped us with a truck, and two of our guys went up to cut her loose” said Hiram. Ospreys are powerful birds, and they can hurt you. As they worked, the eagles mate flew above their heads, shrieking and trying to scare them off. With a lot of care the bird was secured, then the net was cut from her leg, allowing her to fly free once again. Hiram said “once they removed the net, they found it held an old foot from another Osprey, who presumably died this way.”

But today was a happy ending. The staff at CEDO did on a small scale what they do every day – protect a part of the local environment. Go to their website to find out more about CEDOs’ programs for sustainable fishing, protecting endangered species, as well as the educational tours open to the public.                       By Richard Scott

Photos by Hiram Peña

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Wednesday, May 21st, 2014
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Fresh Oyster Safari

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I hate ’em. Oysters. Put ’em on a cracker, put hot sauce on ’em, it won’t help. Have you looked at them? Like something out of Steven King. Some people love them. They tell me Oysters are high in zinc, protein, omega 3 . . . oh, and they’re an aphrodisiac. To who, I wonder, other Oysters?

They also tell me that the best ones, the freshest you can get anywhere are from the oyster farm east of Rocky Point. One weekend I have friends in town who have always wanted to go. Never one to be a party pooper, I jump into the SUV along with everyone else. I’m sure I can keep a straight face and eat three or four of them. They have beer don’t they?
We pull off the highway at a hand written sign that says “ostionera”. Bouncing down the washboard road we squint into the afternoon sun. “That was quick”says my friend as the estuary suddenly spreads out before us. The shallow water spreads out to the high dunes by the sea, sparkling with light. A small flock of birds takes off as we pull into the dusty parking area. In the shallows are a dozen square boxes that house the oysters, looking like a miniature condo project.
Estero Morua is one of the unique estuaries that dot the coast along the northern Sea of Cortez. Created where the Rio Sonoyta enters the ocean, the mixing of waters creates a place full of life. Most noticable are the birds. A major stop during migration, the estuary is also the nesting site for a threatened species of Tern. Piles of discarded shells have been found that date back hundreds of years. The Hohokan were here, fishing and taking shells back to what is now Arizona to trade. These days Arizonans still fish at the mouth of the estuary, and kayak in the shallow waters taking photos.
An old man with weathered skin and a Dodgers baseball cap greets us at the palm roofed ‘restaurant’. We have the place to our selves, and take up a picnic table center-pieced with bottles of hot sauce, limes and salt. “Now you just want to kind of slide them off their shell into your mouth, and not really chew them, just sort of..” “Larry” I say, “I got it, I know how to eat them.” For me, eating them means a dash of hot sauce, a squeeze of lime, and a good amount of feigned non-chalance.
I switch to straight beer drinking sooner than the others, but it wasn’t bad. These oysters had a very mild flavor. I’m sure that’s why they have such a good reputation with seafood lovers. Still, I don’t love ’em. And three beers later, I’m still waiting for the aphrodisiac effect to kick in.
“Man, that was great, we should come again tomorrow” says my friend. The group enthusiastically agrees. And who can blame them. As the sun starts to set, the pink at the edge of the horizon mirrors in the water. You hear the faint flutter of wings as a flock of birds circle low, almost ready to settle for the night. “I want to come back too” I say. “You?” says Larry, “Oysters are good, huh?” “No. I’m going to leave you guys here while I kayak.”

Head East out of town on Freemont Blvd. Within a mile or so you will see signs on the right announcing ‘Ostionera’ (Oyster Farm).     By Richard Scott

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014
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